**********

Saturday, May 05, 2007


"Tigress," the Wind whispered to her ears, "Tis
time to touch Black Water's Edge."

The Tigress rose from the bamboo grove where
she lay.  "So it is time." She replied.

"Yes, loved one." replied the Wind.

And the Tigress began to walk on paths that only
the Tigers can see.

Within a few yards of walking, another golden one
joined her.  It was the Tigress' bound-mate.

"Thank you," said the Tigress to the bound-mate,
"for being willing to see my eyes."

[For the tigers do not often talk of needing close
company or support, but hope that other tigers will
see the need in their eyes.]

"You are welcome." replied the bound-mate.  And
they both walked together, two tigers, side by side.

Finally, the bound-mate softly spoke, "Tigress, I
need to understand.  I needed no such closeness to
you when I touched Black Water's Edge for my sire.
 Indeed, I forbid you to come by my side."

"Tis true."  replied the Tigress.

The bound-mate continued, "Why then did you ask
the Wind to let me see your eyes?"  

"Perhaps I am the weaker of the two of us,"
replied the Tigress.  And then she added, "Perhaps
at times I yearn to still believe the Laws of the
Bound, that you are there for me." Replied the
Tigress.

The bound-mate paused, "I still believe in the Laws
of the Bound," replied the bound-mate, "but there
are many other Laws, and I choose which Laws to
live and when to live them."

"I hear you," replied the Tigress.

Each continued the walk.  The Wind blew alongside
of them both, keeping scents away from them so
that they would not be distracted.

Jungle green-fern and golden bamboo began to
show less and less on their path.  The shadows of
the high tree canopy began to thin.  The soft tread
of rotted leaves began to loose the spongy bounce.  

Soon, black stone began to show through the path.

"Black Water is beginning." said the Tigress, looking
upon the stones by her paws.  And then the three -
Tigress, bound-mate, and Wind - continued walking.

Coarse grass began to show along the pathway,
often growing in small pockets within the black
stones.   Soon, the shadows of the high canopy
softly ceased.

The two tigers walked into a sunlit clearing - and
the black stones had become more numerous, as
well as marked with thousands of small hollows.  
Some larger stones looked as if they were frozen
black waves, frothed with coarse small white
grasses.

The two tigers moved along a black stone path
between two large black boulders.  The path
continued, winding between more boulders.  The
boulders became larger, until they became like the
walls in an arena.

And then, the two tigers slipped into an open area
that had once been an Obsidian quarry, but now,
was long abandoned.

[To the tigers, this was "Black Water's Edge" for
they believed that the earth must have touched the
edge of a pond of ancient water, and turned it to
stone.  For to the tigers, obsidian glass on the
ground appears to be like black water, and the
obsidian glass on the vertical walls appears to be
like black waves.]

More tigers came into the clearing.  And then more.  
And then still more.  Over 50 tigers milled about,
softly speaking in the secret language of the tigers
to each other.

"Truce...." whispered the Wind into the ears of all
the tigers.

Hold-to-Hatred, a sibling of the Tigress, saw the
Tigress and immediately turned her back on her.  
Many-Wounds-And-Giving, another sibling of the
Tigress, saw the Tigress, and warmly greeted her.  

Old-Healer saw the Tigress, and greeted her, and
also deliberately greeted Hold-to-Hatred.  And
Must-Control-Others, another sibling of the Tigress,
also saw the Tigress, and greeted the Tigress with
the former name of the Tigress.

Thus, the emotional conflicts of the tigers clan were
shown, even in the gathering at Black Waters'
Edge.  But the word "Truce" was indeed heard by
the gathering of tigers.

The Tigress wandered to a corner of Black Waters'
Edge by herself.

"Wind," whispered the Tigress, "I recall all the
hatred and control within my pride and among
those of us that were young."  She paused, and
then added, "I fled it all, didn't I?"

"Yes, Tigress," replied the Wind.  "You learned to
walk alone and how to avoid as well as flee."

And the Tigress paused, and then whispered, "I do
not wish to avoid or flee this day.  Please give me
words for the call."

"Tis done, loved one." Whispered back the Wind.

And all was silent for a time.

Not a tiger spoke.

Not one of the golden cats moved.

For the Wind began to howl within the abandoned
quarry, and whip about the obsidian flooring.  The
hollows within the pumice boulders created a sound
like a spirit departing; while the obsidian walls
reflected back the sound all the more.

Then, the Wind brought the scent of a sire's
bound-mate, which was the mother of
Must-Control-Others, Many-Wounds-And-Giving,
Hold-to-Hatred, and the Tigress.

One old tiger called out, "She is gone!  Speak her
calls!"

Into the howling wind called out Avoid-the-Orange,
a tiger that had lost much strength.  He growled
long and hard, "Her call was 'Unconditional love'."

A cub roared out, but could be barely heard,
"Missed...."

A tiger that traveled years with the sire, called out,
"Grief....".

A fully-grown but still youthful tiger called out into
the howling wind, "Provider!"

And then the Tigress began her call.  She roared
into the howling wind, "I was black tiger; I am now
orange."

The wind softened its noise.  And all the tigers,
except Hold-to-Hatred, stared at the Tigress.  
Some, for the first time, realized who the Tigress
had been years before.

The Tigress roared out, "The one that is gone
knew, and she called out, 'Unconditional Love!'

And then the Tigress roared, "I call out for her call,
'You must choose whether to love or not'."

And then, "I call out for her call, "If needed, Forgive
as the Wind forgave you!"

The wind's howl stopped.  The echo in the quarry
ceased.  The scent departed.  

And the old tiger called out, "She is gone!  Her calls
have been spoken!"

And thus, the tigers grieved the loss of the mother
tigress.

One by one, all the tigers departed the quarry.  

And Black Waters' Edge, the place of grieving for
those tigers that have died, was silent once more.


**********

Thursday, May 10, 2007


The Tigress walked past a message tree.

Days before Black Waters' Edge, she had clawed
upon the tree the news that her mother tigress had
died.

After the Calls made at Black Waters' Edge, the
Tigress had scratched yet more news on the
message tree.

This day, below her own scratches, were the
scratches of other tigers.  

[In this way, the tigers show their sympathy to one
another.]

The Tigress moved her golden eyes up and down
the scratches, reading each.

The Wind blew in next to her.

"Many marks are upon the tree." whispered the
Wind.

"Yes, and that is good." replied the Tigress.

"Then why, the concerned look upon your face?"
asked the Wind.

The Tigress paused.  And then, she softly spoke:  "I
see no mark from Old-Giant or his bound-mate.  
And, once, when he was wounded by the dogs, you
told me to give him strength.  And I sought out a
message tree that he would accept, and marked it
carefully for him."

"I know." replied the Wind.  "You did well, Tigress.  
Your message tree gave him and his bound-mate
more strength."

The Tigress paused, and then placed both her huge
paws upon the message tree.

"But Wind," whispered the Tigress, "I see that
there is no mark from him...."

And then the Tigress added, "And the loss of my
own mother tigress, was that not like a wound of
the dogs...  on me?"

"It was a wound, indeed." replied the Wind.

"Can he not hear my pain and respond?" whispered
the Tigress, "As I gave him, cannot he give me?"

The Wind seemed to sigh.  And then the Wind said,
"Old-Giant has abandoned the second of the Laws
of the Rock, and replaced it with lesser laws."

The Tigress slowly withdrew her paws from the
base of the message tree.  She sat down, and
faced the Wind.

"And so," whispered the Tigress, "Old-Giant now
avoids the wounded and walks by the other side?"

"Shhhhh...."  replied the Wind.  "Golden One that I
love, I am speaking to Old-Giant about the matter.  
But I cannot give him a burden greater than he can
bear."

And then, the Tigress was silent.

Finally, the Tigress spoke.  

"Wind," said the Tigress, "If ever Old-Giant is
wounded by the dogs again, please do tell me.  For
I will still mark a message tree or even fight for
him."

"Even though," replied the Wind, "He may avoid
you and abandon you in your time of wounding?"

"Yes." replied the Tigress.  "Simply 'yes'."

And then the Tigress left the message tree, and
wandered into the green jungle.


*********************




(c) Copyright Caryn LeMur 2007
(C) Copyright 2007 Caryn LeMur
The Wind And The Tigress

May, 2007