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Reason!  Analyze the assertions!  Compare the
assertions to the scripture!  The Lord will give
you wisdom!

Much love in Christ;

Caryn LeMur

************************************




Essays For The Thinking
Christian:

Why Do They Hate Us?


Copyright © Caryn LeMur    2006   

The authoress expressly gives the right for anyone to freely
reproduce and distribute this essay verbatim.



I do want to offer a framework view on the
question "Why do some people -- Christian or
non-Christian -- hate the transgendered?"  

Let’s first develop a framework for an
argument consisting of four levels:  (1) belief
systems, (2) definitions, (3) logic, and (4)
evidence.  Most often, I work with those levels
in the order just shown.

Let's play with an example, just to better
understand the four levels of argumentation:

    - Let's say I wanted to create a written
    argument against the death penalty.  

    I would probably begin with discussing the
    ability of mankind to change for the better,
    and how the death of the perpetrator does
    not allow society to welcome back the
    repentant (my belief system).  I may
    define "murder" as only serial killing
    (murder 1, multiple killings, only), and all
    other forms of murder as "manslaughter".  
    I may offer a logic that is inductive
    (working from a small sample population
    out into the general population) that
    shows those men that were executed by
    mistake.  I may also point out that being
    found "guilty of murder" by jury is
    questionable, given the number of cases
    overturned by DNA evidence.  

    -  Oh, I could reverse all the above.  

    My belief system could be that mankind
    never changes and only grows worse with
    time, and that society needs the death of
    the criminal to confirm that the constraints
    of society are valid (and will be upheld).  I
    may define murder as including even
    manslaughter while under the influence of
    alcohol.  I may offer a deductive logic
    (working from a broad classification
    downward).  I may cite evidence of chaotic
    societies where "avengers of blood" are
    used, instead of a valid court system, as
    proof that the death penalty, as used by a
    court system, is stabilizing to a society.  
  
What does all this have to do with the question
– "Why do some people -- Christian or non-
Christian -- hate the transgendered?"  

In my opinion, when someone hates us it is
because we, that are observably within the TG
spectrum, violate someone's (1) belief system.  
We seldom get to debate the other levels of
argumentation:  (2) definitions, (3) logic and
(4) evidence.

In short, the world hates the visibly
transgendered because of the first level of
argumentation -- that is, we violate their belief
system.

Here are three case studies to consider:

    1. My Philippine neighbor recently spoke to
    me.  She's observed me for months.  She
    called me over just this weekend, as we
    were working in our yards at the same
    time, and chatted with me.  "My husband
    told me 'Yes!  That is or was Jim.  And he
    looks good in a skirt!' "  She laughed, and
    then said, "So long as you are happy, that
    is all that matters.  By the way, what is
    your new name?"
 
    Why such a positive reaction?  Most likely,
    her reaction came about because I did not
    violate her belief system at all.  The "so
    long as you are happy" belief system
    allows enormous variation in definitions,
    logic, and normally doesn't care about any
    evidence, let alone arguments of validity
    for evidence.  My chat with my neighbor
    was an easy and very friendly meeting.
 
    2. One of my sisters met with a pastor, and
    they both decided to "Turn me over to
    Satan".  If I debate level 3 (logic), then I
    would argue that "turning someone over
    to Satan" is the third step of the four-step
    process of excommunication in Matthew 18
    (that is, meet alone, meet with witnesses,
    meet with witnesses and church
    authorities, and extend forgiveness).  I
    have not been allowed a defense (as
    required in step 1, 2, and 3 of Matthew 18)
    and therefore "Turning me over to Satan"
    is inappropriate and invalid.  But again, if I
    am debating level 3 (logical order of
    excommunication), it is good to ask myself,
    'what level of argument is my sister
    experiencing'?
 
    When I look at level 1 (belief systems),
    then, I understand my sister's motive --
    she is still in mourning for the loss of her
    brother, and desperately needed closure.  
    Her belief system (towards me) is one of
    mourning.  The pastor understood her
    need, and within his belief system, tried to
    meet her need.  Yes, I received a piece of
    hate mail from her, and read it.  But I read
    it in context of her pain within her belief
    system (level 1 of argumentation), and
    decided to continue to live by her edict:  
    "Never contact me again.  Not even at my
    funeral."  In this manner, hopefully, my
    sister will have the distance she needs to
    heal.
 
    3.  Those that have read "Letter To My
    Rapist" (which is on this website) have
    encountered a not-so-nice view of a pastor
    that verbally attempted to rape my mind
    into conformity to his (that is, the pastor's)
    belief system.  His belief system is simple,
    "I must protect the flock at all costs, even
    if it means destroying Caryn.".  Since I
    visited his church, quietly, and without
    even conversing with him, you might think
    his response and attack to my visit is
    extremely over-the-top.  
 
    But... that pastor sleeps well at night,
    because his written attack and un-Christ-
    like actions towards me were all within his
    belief system.  After all, his belief system
    allows the shepherd to defend the helpless
    'sheep' of his flock.  Does the shepherd
    weep over the bear or lion he killed? No,
    not at all.  Instead, the shepherd rejoices
    over the dead body, brags about the
    exploit in church meetings, and points to
    the 'head' mounted on the wall as proof of
    his manhood.
 
So, now you've been exposed to level 1 of
argumentation -- belief systems.  And, I hope
I've shown you how that belief systems can be
so foundational, that the other levels of
argumentation -- definitions, logic, and
evidence -- are often filtered or even thrown
aside.

Can we sum up the belief system of Christ?  
What is His foundational level of argument that
filters all His actions while on this Earth?  From
what belief system did the greatest Rabbi
further build His arguments of definitions, logic,
and evidence?

I think we can sum up the belief system of the
Christ, and it is this:  "Bear one another's
burdens, and thus fulfill the Law of Christ"
[Galatians 6:2]

How have my neighbor, sister, and the pastor
helped to “fulfill the Law of Christ”?  My
Philippine neighbor accepts me, but she did not
offer to help bear my burdens, yes?  My sister is
in mourning, and will not be able to help bear
my burdens perhaps for a few years.  The
pastor that attacked me has forsaken imitating
all of Christ, and only wishes to imitate the
parts of Christ that appeal to his personality
and need to verify his ability to protect his small
flock.

What should I do?  After all, they have forsaken
the Law of Christ, shouldn't I do the same?

As time has passed on, I've decided that I
should fulfill the Law of Christ:

    - To the neighbor that accepts me, we
    discussed a large bush that overlaps the
    property lines.  Soon thereafter, I trimmed
    much of it, and a few days later, she
    finished the trimming herself.  

    - To my sister in mourning, I shall pray for
    her healing, and watch for a door to open
    in the future, but I will not contact her
    without her permission, as she requested.  
    I will give her the distance she needs to
    heal.

    - To the pastor, I sent a letter of
    encouragement when I learned that he
    was emotionally suffering because his
    church is approaching financial and spiritual
    bankruptcy.
 
Do I like the furnace of belief systems that are
not according to the Law of Christ?  No, not at
all, really.  

But the fires of their belief systems have given
me incredible privileges of living Matthew
chapter 5:

    - I know what it is like to turn the other
    cheek, only to be slapped again;

    - I know what it is like to carry someone's
    burden further than is appropriate by
    reason of justice or custom;

    - I know what it is like to be 'sued' for
    excommunication in a mockery court of a
    pastor and his assistant, given no chance
    for presenting a defense, and reviled...
    and I know what it is like to have given
    them the tunic of avoiding their church,
    and the cloak of encouragement as well.

Can you hear the Master's voice in Matthew
chapter 5?  How about hearing His voice with
these benefits of being hated:

    - I've learned so slowly to bless those that
    curse me;

    - I've begun to love my enemies, and to
    give them the soothing oil of comfort and
    good wine of God's encouragement;

    - I'm learning to make my sun rise on the
    evil and the good, and to make my rain to
    fall upon the just and the unjust; and

    - I'm becoming a daughter of God,
    because the furnace is teaching me to live
    by the Law of Christ.
 
I am learning to "count it all joy" in the midst of
"diverse trials" that act like a furnace on my
faith because my faith is being purified.  

And as the furnace heats up, I know that the
'fourth man' will appear in the furnace with me
(as He did for Daniel's companions), and
instruct me how to better ascertain and bear
the burdens of those that hate us, even as the
'fourth man' centuries later, ascertained that
all mankind was overcome by sin, and bore the
burdens of all mankind on Calvary's cross.  

"The God we worship can save us from the
fiery furnace.  But even if our God does not, we
still will not worship the idols you have
established." Said Daniel's companions to the
King.  [Daniel 3] I like their attitude.  After all,
the furnace of belief systems have hated and
even killed for thousands of years.  And one
day, the hatred generated by belief systems
may one day kill my body.

Yes, in their hatred, I may die.  My physical
body would then cease to live.  But why should
I bow down to the idol of living by anything less
than the Law of Christ – which is to carry their
burdens?

Their burdens -- not mine.

In my opinion, we are terribly privileged to be
hated, for their belief systems have become the
furnace that purifies our faith.

*********

Much love in Christ, always and forever;

Caryn LeMur.



Copyright © Caryn LeMur    2006   

The authoress expressly gives the right for anyone to freely
reproduce and distribute this essay verbatim.
Essays For The Thinking Christian

Why Do They Hate Us?